Today: Jul 09 , 2020

Yavapai County COVID-19 Death Total Rises to 4
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09 May 2020   Terri Farneti, Yavapai County Public Health Coordinator

Yavapai County Community Health Services 

Yavapai County has 178 COVID-19 Cases

Apache

710

Coconino

679

Cochise

41

Graham

19

Greenlee

2

Gila

19

La Paz

22

Maricopa

5,779

Mohave

178

Navajo

981

Pima

1,554

Pinal

585

Santa Cruz

40

Yavapai

178

Yuma

176

128,940 Arizonans have been tested for COVID-19 with 10,960 positive cases and 532 deaths. Yavapai County has tested 4,356 residents (352 more reported tests since yesterday), 178 positives, 13 recovered, and sadly, we now have 4 deaths.  VVMC reports no hospitalizations from COVID-19, with 3 persons under investigation (PUI).  YRMC reports 1 hospitalization with COVID-19, 5 PUIs on West Campus, 4 on the East Campus.  The VA has noCOVID-19 hospitalizations or PUIs.

Antibody blood tests, also called antibody tests, check your blood by looking for antibodies, which show if you had a previous infection with the virus. Depending on when someone was infected and the timing of the test, the test may not find antibodies in someone with a current COVID-19 infection. Antibodies are proteins that help fight off infections. Antibody tests should not be used to diagnose someone as being currently sick with COVID-19. To see if you have a current infection, you need a viral test, which checks respiratory samples, such as a swab from inside your nose.  These are the tests offered during the AZ Testing Blitz today and next Saturday by Spectrum Healthcare and Yavapai Regional Medical Center. 

How to get an antibody test – call your healthcare provider or check out the testing sites listed atwww.yavapai.us/chs 

If you test positive: 

  • A positive test result shows you have antibodies that likely resulted from an infection with SARS-CoV-2, or possibly a related coronavirus.
  • It’s unclear if those antibodies can provide protection (immunity) against getting infected again. This means that we do not know at this time if antibodies make you immune to the virus.
  • If you have no symptoms, you likely do not have an active infection and no additional follow-up is needed.
  • If you have symptoms and meet other guidelines for testing, you would need another type of test called a nucleic acid test, or viral test. This test uses respiratory samples, such as a swab from inside your nose, to confirm COVID-19. An antibody test cannot tell if you are currently sick with COVID-19.
  • It’s possible you might test positive for antibodies and you might not have or have ever had symptoms of COVID-19. This is known as having an asymptomatic infection, or an infection without symptoms.
If you test negative:
  • If you test negative for COVID-19 antibodies, you probably did not have a previous infection that has gotten better. However, you could have a current infection. It’s possible you could still get sick if you have been exposed to the virus recently, since antibodies don’t show up for 1 to 3 weeks after infection. This means you could still spread the virus.
  • Some people may take even longer to develop antibodies, and some people may not develop antibodies.
  • If you have symptoms and meet other guidelines for testing, you would need another type of test called a nucleic acid test, or viral test. This test uses respiratory samples, such as a swab from inside your nose, to confirm COVID-19. An antibody test cannot tell if you are currently sick with COVID-19.